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Wisconsin legislators push for road tolls


WISCONSIN (WAOW)- Road tolls could be coming to part of the badger state if some legislators have their way.

Some republican lawmakers say tolls are the only way to solve infrastructure issues with the possibility of generating billions of dollars.

Residents tell News 9 they are not happy about it.

“I agree that the pot holes are a problem,” said Marguerit Stoffel who lives in Marathon. “I feel that there are different ways they can find money to fix this.”

However, the controversy relies in how to fund it.

“Our state has sales tax and most states that do have tolls don’t have sales tax so I don’t think we need both,” Stoffel said.

Republican state legislators are advocated for tolls on I-94.

“We would be able to create revenue that would help maintain that highway system and free up the dollars that would normally go there to dollars that could go to other parts of the state,” said Representative of the 85th Assembly District Pat Snyder.

That idea is not sitting well with residents.

“It will impact every body, who wants to pay more they are already taking money out of our pocket,” said another resident.

The tolls would only be placed on I-94 and help repair just that highway.

But, many people travel across the state and those tolls could cost between $1-$3.

Snyder estimates installing costs could be up to $10 million.

“I want to see what the feasibility is I want to see what the cost factor is,” Snyder said.

In a statement Representative Katrina Shankland said she is just glad this long term issue about road repair is  in the works to be fixed.

“I’m heartened that we are finally having conversations with experts across the state to find solutions, and am looking forward to hearing from the governor’s transportation task force about their ideas to fix our roads and bridges,” the statement said.

Snyder said it will take a few years at least to have tolls confirmed.

As of now, they are waiting on approval from the federal government before it can move through  the legislature.

 

Victoria Saha

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